Allergen Alerts: Mustard!

So you’ve discovered that you have a mustard allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have mustard on your burgers anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Mustard is found in a lot more than just the BBQ condiment, as you originally thought. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain mustards:

    • Condiments
    • Salad Dressings (vinaigrettes and cruditées)
    • Spices, flavouring or seasoning
    • Sauces:
      • Barbecue
      • Curry
      • Cumberland
      • Ketchup, tomato sauces
      • Béarnaises
      • Mayonnaises
      • Pesto
      • Vinaigrettes
      • Gravies, Marinades
    • Curries, Chutneys
    • Pickles and other pickled products
    • Vegetables with vinegar
    • Dehydrated soups
    • Processed Meat (sausages, salami etc.) including hamburgers/steakettes, some fast food products

Other possible sources of mustard: 

    • Some appetizers
    • Dehydrated mashed potatoes
    • Some baby/toddlers prepackaged food
    • Sprouted seeds

Note: This list is not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Mustard – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_mustard-moutarde/index-eng.php .

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, mustard allergy FAQs, sources of mustard, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 1
Reason for Recall: Allergen – mustard
Product(s): Noah martin’s Black Forest salami
Recalling Firm: Heidelberg Foods Ltd. (EST 644)
Distribution: deli locations in Ontario

Product details are available at  http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2013/20130111e.shtml

What’s a Class 1 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a high risk case (There is a high risk that eating or drinking that product will lead to serious health problems or death).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you’ll also find these alerts on the FAE Facebook Page if you are a big Facebooker and have Liked the Page. You can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! 🙂

Allergen Alerts: Peanuts!

So you’ve discovered that you have a mustard allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have PB&J sandwiches anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Peanuts are found in a lot more than just that jar of peanut butter in the back of your fridge. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain peanuts

    • Ethnic foods, such as satay, Thai (for example, curries), Vietnamese (for example, crushed peanut as a topping, spring rolls) or Chinese (for example, Szechuan sauce, egg rolls)
    • Hydrolyzed plant protein and vegetable protein
    • Vegetarian meat substitutes™

Other possible sources of peanuts

    • Almond & hazelnut paste, marzipan, nougat
    • Baked goods
    • Chili
    • Cereals
    • Desserts
    • Dried salad dressings and soup mixes
    • Icing, glazes
    • Snack foods, for example, trail mixes

Non-food sources of peanuts

    • Ant baits, bird feed, mouse traps and pet food
    • Cosmetics and sunscreens
    • Craft materials
    • Medications and vitamins
    • Mushroom growing medium
    • Stuffing in toys

Note: These lists are not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Peanuts – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_peanut-arachide/index-eng.php.

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, peanut allergy FAQs, sources of peanuts, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 2
Reason for Recall: Allergen – peanut
Product(s): Dymatize Nutrition brand Elite Gourmet Cookies & Cream bar
Distribution: Internet, and may have been distributed nationally

Product details are available at
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2013/20130109be.shtml

What’s a Class 2 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a moderate risk case (There is a moderate risk that eating or drinking that product will most likely lead to short-term or non-life threatening health problems).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you’ll also find these alerts on the FAE Facebook Page if you are a big Facebooker and have Liked the Page. You can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! :)

Allergen Alert: Egg!

So you’ve discovered that you have a egg allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have eggs with breakfast anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Egg pops up in a lot more dishes, than you originally thought. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain eggs

    • Baked goods (including some type of breads) and baking mixes
    • Battered and fried foods
    • Cream-filled desserts, for example, custards, meringues, puddings and ice creams
    • Egg and fat substitutes
    • Fat replacers, for example, Simplesse™
    • Lecithin
    • Mayonnaise
    • Meat products with fillers, for example, meatballs and meatloaf
    • Nougats, marzipan candy
    • Pasta (fresh pasta, some types of dry pasta for example, egg noodles)
    • Quiche, soufflé
    • Salad dressings, creamy dressings
    • Sauces, for example, Béarnaise, hollandaise, Newburg, tartar

Other possible sources of eggs

    • Alcoholic cocktails and drinks, for example, eggnog and whiskey sours
    • Fish mixtures, for example, surimi (used in imitation crab and lobster meat)
    • Foam and milk toppings on coffee
    • Homemade root beer mixes and malt-drink mixes
    • Icing, glazes
    • Meat products with fillers, for example, preprepared hamburger patties, hotdogs and cold cuts
    • Soups, broths and bouillons

Non-food sources of egg

    • Anesthetic, for example, Diprivan (propofol)
    • Craft materials
    • Hair-care products
    • Medications
    • Some vaccines, for example, MMR (measles, mumps and rubella)

Note: These lists are not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Egg – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_egg-oeuf/index-eng.php.

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, egg allergy FAQs, sources of egg, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) also has a good reference page on Food Allergies and Allergen Labelling Information for Consumers.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the CFIA. When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 1
Reason for Recall: Allergen – egg
Product(s): Kinnikinnick Foods Pie Crusts
Recalling Firm: Kinnikinnick Foods Inc.
Distribution: British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario, but may have been distributed nationally.

Product details are available at:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20121229e.shtml

Common food allergens – http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food_allergies

What’s a Class 1 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a high risk case (There is a high risk that eating or drinking that product will lead to serious health problems or death).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you’ll also find these alerts on the FAE Facebook Page if you are a big Facebooker and have Liked the Page. You can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! :)

 

Allergen Alert: Soy!

So you’ve discovered that you have a soy allergy. No big deal, right? You just stick with plain white rice vs. the traditional fried rices that contain soya sauce …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Soy is found in a lot more than just your favourite Asian take-out dish. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain mustards:

  • Bean sprouts
  • Bread crumbs, cereals and crackers
  • Breaded foods
  • Hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP), hydrolyzed soy protein (HSP) and hydrolyzed vegetable
  • protein (HVP)
  • Imitation dairy food
  • Infant formula, follow-up formula, nutrition supplements for toddlers and children
  • Meal replacements
  • Meat products with fillers, for example, burgers and prepared ground meat products
  • Mexican foods, for example, chili, taco fillings and tamales
  • Miso
  • Nutrition supplements
  • Sauces, for example, soy, shoyu, tamari,teriyaki, Worcestershire
  • Simulated fish and meat products, for example, surimi, imitation bacon bits,vegetarian burgers
  • Stews, for example, in gravies
  • Tempeh
  • Vegetarian dishes

Other possible sources of soy:

  • Baked goods and baking mixes
  • Beverage mixes, for example, hot chocolate and lemonade
  • Canned tuna and minced hams, for example, seasoned or mixed with other ingredients for flavour
  • Chewing gum
  • Cooking spray, margarine, vegetable shortening and vegetable oil
  • Dressings, gravies and marinades
  • Frozen desserts
  • Lecithin
  • Milled corn
  • Meat products with fillers, for example, preprepared hamburger patties, hotdogs and cold cuts
  • Seafood -based products and fish
  • Seasoning and spices
  • Snack foods, for example, soy nuts
  • Soups, broths, soup mixes and stocks
  • Soy pasta
  • Spreads, dips, mayonnaise and peanut butter
  • Thickening agents
  • Mono-diglyceride
  • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (may contain hydrolyzed protein)

Non-food sources of soy:

  • Cosmetics and soaps
  • Craft materials
  • Glycerine
  • Milk substitutes for young animals
  • Pet food
  • Vitamins

Note: This list is not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Soy – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_soy-soja/index-eng.php

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, soy allergy FAQs, sources of mustard, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 3
Reason for Recall: Allergen – mustard
Product(s): certain Savoury Express and Sub Delicious brand products
Recalling Firm: King’s Processing Ltd.
Distribution: New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island

Product details are available at http://active.inspection.gc.ca/scripts/database/recarapp_refsubmit.asp?lang=e&ref=7689

What’s a Class 3 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a low or no risk case (Eating or drinking that product will not likely result in any undesirable health effects. Class III recalls can include food products that pose no health and safety risk, but do not follow federal food regulations).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! :)

Allergen Alerts: Milk!

2

So you’ve discovered that you have a milk allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have milk chocolate bars anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Milk is found in a lot more products than you originally thought. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Common sources of milk:

    • Butter, Buttermilk
    • Cheese, curds
    • Cream, ice cream
    • Ghee and butter fat
    • Kefir (milk drink)
    • Kumiss (fermented milk drink)
    • Sour cream
    • Yogourt

Food and products that contain or often contain milk:

    • Artificial butter, butter flavour or butter oil
    • Dark chocolate
    • Baked goods (including some type of breads) and baking mixes
    • Battered and fried foods
    • Broth and bouillons
    • Caramel colouring or flavouring
    • Casseroles, frozen prepared foods
    • Cereals, cookies and crackers
    • Chocolate bars
    • Desserts, for example, custards, frozen yogourts, ice creams and puddings
    • Dips and salad dressings
    • Egg and fat substitutes
    • Fat replacers, for example, Opta™ and Simplesse®
    • Glazes
    • Gravies and sauces
    • High-protein flour
    • Malt-drink mixes
    • Margarine
    • Pâtés and sausages
    • Pizza
    • Potatoes (instant, mashed and scalloped potatoes)
    • Seasonings
    • Soups and soup mixes, cream soups
    • Soy cheese

Other possible sources of milk:

    • Canned tuna, for example, seasoned or mixed with other ingredients for flavour
    • Candy, fruit and granola bars, for example, those containing caramel or chocolate
    • Flavoured coffee, coffee whitener and non-dairy creamer
    • Some french fries (made from potato mixture or mashed potatoes)
    • Some hot dogs, deli and processed meats
    • Nougats
    • Seasoned chips, for example, sour cream and onion
    • Waxes on some fruit and vegetables

Non-food sources of milk:

    • Cosmetics
    • Medications
    • Pet food

Ingredients that do not contain milk protein:

    • Calcium/sodium lactate
    • Calcium/sodium stearoyl lactylate
    • Cocoa butter
    • Cream of tartar
    • Oleoresin

Note: These lists are not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Milk – One of the ten priority food allergens, http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_milk-lait/index-eng.php

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, mustard allergy FAQs, sources of mustard, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 1
Reason for Recall: Allergen – milk
Product(s): Cinnamon Crunch
Recalling Firm: Kasseler Food Products Inc.
Distribution: nationally

Product details are available at http://inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2013/20130109e.shtml

What’s a Class 1 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a high risk case (There is a high risk that eating or drinking that product will lead to serious health problems or death). Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food.

Safe & Happy Eating! 🙂

Listeria Alert!: Veggie Patch Ultimate Meatless Burger

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 1
Reason for Recall: Health Hazard – listeria
Product(s): Veggie Patch brand The Ultimate Meatless Burger
Recalling Firm: Costco Wholesale Canada Inc.
Distribution: New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec

Product details are available at: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20121130e.shtml

Food Safety Facts on Listeria: http://inspection.gc.ca/pathogen_listeria

Allergen (Gluten) Alert! M Brand Rice

19 December 2012: Wheat in M brand Rice

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 2
Reason for Recall: Allergen – wheat
Product(s): M – Rice
Recalling Firm: Ka Wing Hong Ltd.
Distribution: British Columbia, Ontario

Product details are available at http://active.inspection.gc.ca/scripts/database/recarapp_refsubmit.asp?lang=e&ref=7659

Wheat Allergy – http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/consumer-centre/food-safety-tips/labelling-food-packaging-and-storage/wheat/eng/1332440575352/1332440633913

Note that this is a Class 2 (Moderate Risk) Recall: Eating or drinking that product will most likely lead to short-term or non-life threatening health problems.
Refer to the CFIA website for full details on Recall Definitions: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

Previous Gluten Alerts:

November 16 2012: Campbell’s V8 Golden Autumn Carrot Soup

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

895260_V8_Carrot_TR

Class 3
Reason for Recall: Allergen – Gluten
Product(s): Golden Autumn Carrot Soup
Recalling Firm: Campbell Company of Canada
Distribution: National

Product details are available at http://bit.ly/T4YMxH

Wheat Allergy – http://inspection.gc.ca/gluten_intolerance

Note that this is a Class 3 (Low and No Risk) Recall: Eating or drinking that product will not likely result in any undesirable health effects. Class III recalls can include food products that pose no health and safety risk, but do not follow federal food regulations.
Refer to the CFIA website for full details on Recall Definitions: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

19 October 2012: Undeclared wheat in certain Piller’s brand Sub Pac Classic and Sliced Pepperoni products

20121019a

OTTAWA, October 19, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Piller’s Fine Foods are warning people with allergies to wheat and / or sensitivity to gluten not to serve or consume Piller’s brand Sub Pac Classic and Sliced Pepperoni products described in this notice. The affected products contain wheat which is not declared on the label.

These products were distributed in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. However, they may have been distributed in other provinces.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Consumption of these products may cause a serious or life-threatening reaction in persons with allergies to wheat. Also, these products represent a health risk to gluten sensitive individuals / Celiac sufferers.

Piller’s Fine Foods, Waterloo, ON is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20121019e.shtml

28 May 2012:

I just got an email from the Newfoundland Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association. The following products have been recalled due to gluten: Designer Whey Protein Powder in French Vanilla and Strawberry.

http://active.inspection.gc.ca/scripts/database/recarapp_refsubmit.asp?lang=e&ref=7174

Allergen (Sulphite) Alert: LEE’S LUXURY MINI SNOWBALLS

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

snowball3

Class 3
Reason for Recall: Allergen – Sulphites
Product(s): Lee’s – Luxury Mini Snowballs
Recalling Firm: Coleman Group Of Companies
Distribution: Newfoundland and Labrador

Product details are available at http://active.inspection.gc.ca/scripts/database/recarapp_refsubmit.asp?lang=e&ref=7572

Sulphite Sensitivity – http://inspection.gc.ca/food/consumer-centre/food-safety-tips/labelling-food-packaging-and-storage/sulphites/eng/1332438953632/1332439026694

Previous Sulphite Alerts:

16 November 2012: Madeira Mix

inanutshell

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 3
Reason for Recall: Allergen – Sulphites
Product(s): Madeira Mix
Recalling Firm: David Roberts Food Corporation
Distribution: National

Product details are available at http://active.inspection.gc.ca/scripts/database/recarapp_refsubmit.asp?lang=e&ref=7571

Sulphite Sensitivity – http://inspection.gc.ca/sulphite_sensitivity

Allergen (Tree Nut) Alert: Undeclared potential for Almonds in PC brand Milk Chocolate Covered Raisins

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Loblaw Companies Limited (Loblaw) are warning people with allergies to almonds not to consume the PC brand Milk Chocolate covered Raisins described below because the affected product may contain almonds which are not declared on the label.

20121113a

The affected product, President’s Choice (PC) brand Milk Chocolate Covered Raisins, is sold in 908 g packages (Club Pack), bearing UPC 0 60383 98203 4 and Best Before date 2013 JL 15.

This product has been distributed nationally.

See the CFIA release here: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20121113e.shtml

Salmonella Alert: Purefit Peanut Butter Crunch Bars (Gluten-Free/Low Glycemic/Vegan Product)

8

The CFIA has issued a warning that some PUREFIT brand PEANUT BUTTER CRUNCH BARS may contain Salmonella. This is part of a very large U.S. recall of certain peanut products.

The recalled bars are sold individually and in packs of 15. The individual bars have Best Before Dates between 1 March 2012and 12 July 2013.

For more information visit: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20121016e.shtml