Cookbook Recipe Trial: Pumpkin Pancakes

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As I mentioned in my earlier post which profiled the FREE FOR ALL COOKING: 150 EASY GLUTEN-FREE, ALLERGY-FRIENDLY RECIPES cookbook, it only took about a year and one “snowpocalypse” to attempt this recipe. I’ll apologize in advance for the lack of “oomph” that my pancake pictures bring to the table …. but I assure you that the taste made up for the lack of presentation effort on my part. What happened was: we were in the middle of the worst snow storm (actually blizzard) that I can remember since moving to St. John’s in 2001, and we were racing against time to prepare breakfast before our power cut out again. In hindsight – probably not the smartest move on my part, to profile a recipe for my blog under these circumstances ….. but I had psyched myself up for these pancakes when I went to bed, and they were the first thing that I thought of when I woke up that morning. I needed those pancakes to be in my belly!

To give you an idea of how intense the storm was, nearly 50cm fell and wind gusts of more than 100 km/h were experienced. We were one of the few lucky sections of the city to only loose our power for about 30 minutes. The power went out early Friday morning and for some, it was late Saturday afternoon before power was reinstated. The airport had also shut down until midnight Saturday night due to the storm (which was further impacted by an ongoing strike by maintenance workers). Like I said, it was one of the most intense snow storms that the city had seen in years.

Before: Mid Afternoon, Thursday January 10th 2013. After: Mid Morning Friday January 11th 2013.

Before: Mid Afternoon, Thursday January 10th 2013. After: Mid Morning Friday January 11th 2013.

Ever since I had my first pumpkin cinnamon roll from Gluten Free Treasures at my local Farmer’s Market, I realized that I was IN LOVE with everything pumpkin! So when I stumbled across the Pumpkin Pancake recipe in  this cookbook, I knew that it would be the first recipe that I would attempt.

Pumpkin Pancakes

As I mentioned in my post that profiled the cookbook, the recipes are written for use with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Blend. Considering that I didn’t have all of the ingredients in my pantry to mix a batch of her flour blend, I turned to another fine lady named “Pamela” and opened the package of her baking and pancake mix that my friend, Felicia, had surprised me with a while back. Felicia raved about the mix but … once again … I hadn’t found the time to test it out. I thought that I would substitute the Pamela’s flour blend for that of Jules’ blend and see how it turned out.

I won’t reproduce the recipe here, but the recipe did consist of:

  • gluten-free flour
  • baking powder
  • pumpkin pie spice
  • cinnamon
  • egg (or egg substitute)
  • cooking oil
  • brown sugar
  • pureed pumpkin
  • milk
  • optional: raisins, cranberries or chocolate chips (I opted for plain pumpkin pancakes).

Although we eat food with dairy, we don’t normally purchase milk for use as a beverage, and as a result there was none in the fridge to use in the recipe. Luckily I had a carton of almond milk in the cupboard. We had eggs in the fridge so they were used in the recipe. At some point I might attempt an eggless version … but for the time being, I was running against the clock to finish the pancakes before the power cut out again (thankfully though, it remained on for the remainder of the day).

The pancakes were a little denser than a regular pancake because of the pumpkin … but then again …. all gluten-free pancakes are denser than your ‘regular’ pancake, so no difference there. Regardless of the density of the pancake, the result was absolutely delicious!

The recipe serves 4 and because my guy decided that he would only take one pancake to eat with his breakfast ….. it meant that I had enough for leftovers! There’s nothing better than warming up a pancake when you’re in the office on a Monday morning!! Just don’t forget the maple syrup! ….. unless you’re allergic …. then, go ahead and forget the maple syrup! 😉

As I was scanning through the recipe to write this post, I noticed that Jules suggests that you strategically place chocolate chips after flipping to create the illusion of a jack-o-latern … Jules: I like your style! And I like love Halloween. I will DEFINITELY be making jack-o-lantern pumpkin pancakes, next Halloween! 🙂

Jules has several recipes related to pumpkin included in the cookbook, which is great because now I have more ways to feed my love of pumpkin. Up next? Pumpkin Corn Muffins! 🙂

Free For All Cooking: 150 Easy Gluten-Free, Allergy-Friendly Recipes

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I ordered this cookbook quite some time ago with the intention of trying out some new recipes. It only took about a year later and one “snowpocalypse” to attempt my first recipe from it. The result? Deliciousness! … But I’ve saved the details for a separate post 🙂

0738213950

I discovered this cookbook, along with several others that I have yet to try out, from the Living Without Website. A list of all their cookbooks that are available for sale are found here: http://www.livingwithout.com/products/ … The magazine is a US publication and there is usually a link for Canadian purchases, which can mean higher prices but most always means higher shipping costs. I’d recommend checking out Chapters.ca or Amazon.ca to see if you can find a better deal, as you can combine with other products and receive free shipping if you cart total is usually above $25 (or some other determined amount).

What I like about this cookbook is that it is broken into two parts:

Part I: Essentials for Gluten-Free Baking

Part II: The Recipes

The majority of Part I is dedicated to ingredients and substitutions. Jules starts out by giving an overview of the items that one might find in their pantry which are basic/naturally gluten-free. She then gives a list of safe, gluten-free ingredients (such as grains, pseudocereals, beans, etc.) and then follows up with a list of evil non-gluten-free grains and other ingredients to avoid.

One of the most useful parts of the book is the Handy Substitution Guide. The guide starts out talking about Flour and how Jules devised her Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Blend. It then discusses other premixed blends, as well as making your own gluten-free blend.

She then lists other gluten-free ingredients that you should keep on hand, such as baking powder, baking soda, yeast, sugar and sweeteners, gluten-free oats/cereals/chips,  as well as flax seeds. She gives an overview of each one, lists several brands that she has used, and also makes some references to use in recipes found throughout the book.

Egg substitutes are the next topic and one that I thought was presented very well. She briefly discusses store-bought egg replacers but goes into great detail about homemade egg replacers. She gives a recipe for 12 different egg replacer recipes and groups them according to what they are best suited for:

  • Quick-breads
  • Yeast breads
  • Batters
  • Pancakes
  • Cakes
  • Brownies
  • Cookies
  • Savory Dishes
  • Replacing Egg Yolks
  • Frying foods or browning crusts

Dairy and soy substitutes are also presented. Substitutes for milk, buttermilk, Half-and-Half/heavy cream, evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk, yogurt/sour cream, butter/shortening, cheese/cream cheese, ice-cream/whipped cream are explained with recipes for non-dairy evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk given.

Nut substitutes are explained and are broken out according to whether you are looking for the nutty texture, or the nutty taste.

Jules then discusses alcohols in baking. She notes that although distilled alcohols are gluten-free, you need to be weary of added flavourings. She also discusses use of gluten-free beers in her recipes, as well as flavour extracts.

My favourite part of the book is that there are food restriction icons for each recipe which include: Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Nut-Free, Soy-Free, Egg-Free or Vegetarian. Many of the recipes are possible this way because Jules highlights the option for substitution. For example, for many of the egg replacements she suggests which Egg Replacer recipe to use which will save you time when executing the recipe! 🙂

Part I is then capped off with some baking notes … which I thought came in handy. For example, I had no idea that kneading gluten-free doughs actually do more harm than good (…. Good tip, Jules! Thanks)

Once you’ve digested (figuratively, of course) all of this info, it’s time to jump into the next stage of actual digestion – the recipe execution!! Part II is broken out into:

  • Breakfast Foods
  • Appetizers & Side Dishes
  • Breads & Rolls
  • Soups
  • Main Events; and last but not least
  • Desserts (the largest section! Jules, you know the way to a girl’s heart!)

This cookbook looks fantastic and should give those with food allergies and food intolerances the ability to enjoy fantastic meals and treats without having to worry about their safety or digestion woes!!

As I try out recipes from this cookbook, I’ll update with links below!

If you are currently using this cookbook, please share what your favourite recipes are! 

Happy Baking/Cooking & Eating!!

Krista.

Allergen Alerts: Mustard!

So you’ve discovered that you have a mustard allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have mustard on your burgers anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Mustard is found in a lot more than just the BBQ condiment, as you originally thought. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain mustards:

    • Condiments
    • Salad Dressings (vinaigrettes and cruditées)
    • Spices, flavouring or seasoning
    • Sauces:
      • Barbecue
      • Curry
      • Cumberland
      • Ketchup, tomato sauces
      • Béarnaises
      • Mayonnaises
      • Pesto
      • Vinaigrettes
      • Gravies, Marinades
    • Curries, Chutneys
    • Pickles and other pickled products
    • Vegetables with vinegar
    • Dehydrated soups
    • Processed Meat (sausages, salami etc.) including hamburgers/steakettes, some fast food products

Other possible sources of mustard: 

    • Some appetizers
    • Dehydrated mashed potatoes
    • Some baby/toddlers prepackaged food
    • Sprouted seeds

Note: This list is not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Mustard – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_mustard-moutarde/index-eng.php .

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, mustard allergy FAQs, sources of mustard, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 1
Reason for Recall: Allergen – mustard
Product(s): Noah martin’s Black Forest salami
Recalling Firm: Heidelberg Foods Ltd. (EST 644)
Distribution: deli locations in Ontario

Product details are available at  http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2013/20130111e.shtml

What’s a Class 1 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a high risk case (There is a high risk that eating or drinking that product will lead to serious health problems or death).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you’ll also find these alerts on the FAE Facebook Page if you are a big Facebooker and have Liked the Page. You can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! 🙂

Allergen Alerts: Peanuts!

So you’ve discovered that you have a mustard allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have PB&J sandwiches anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Peanuts are found in a lot more than just that jar of peanut butter in the back of your fridge. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain peanuts

    • Ethnic foods, such as satay, Thai (for example, curries), Vietnamese (for example, crushed peanut as a topping, spring rolls) or Chinese (for example, Szechuan sauce, egg rolls)
    • Hydrolyzed plant protein and vegetable protein
    • Vegetarian meat substitutes™

Other possible sources of peanuts

    • Almond & hazelnut paste, marzipan, nougat
    • Baked goods
    • Chili
    • Cereals
    • Desserts
    • Dried salad dressings and soup mixes
    • Icing, glazes
    • Snack foods, for example, trail mixes

Non-food sources of peanuts

    • Ant baits, bird feed, mouse traps and pet food
    • Cosmetics and sunscreens
    • Craft materials
    • Medications and vitamins
    • Mushroom growing medium
    • Stuffing in toys

Note: These lists are not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Peanuts – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_peanut-arachide/index-eng.php.

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, peanut allergy FAQs, sources of peanuts, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 2
Reason for Recall: Allergen – peanut
Product(s): Dymatize Nutrition brand Elite Gourmet Cookies & Cream bar
Distribution: Internet, and may have been distributed nationally

Product details are available at
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2013/20130109be.shtml

What’s a Class 2 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a moderate risk case (There is a moderate risk that eating or drinking that product will most likely lead to short-term or non-life threatening health problems).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you’ll also find these alerts on the FAE Facebook Page if you are a big Facebooker and have Liked the Page. You can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! :)

They Love Me, They Really Love Me: How Friends & Family are Adapting to My Gluten Intolerance

I couldn’t resist misquoting “The Mask” who misquoted Sally Fields’ 1985 Oscar Acceptance speech. I thought it was fitting, because my family and friends obviously love me enough to put up with and cater to my gluten intolerance.

Here are a few examples:

  • If I’m dropping my Guy to work and as he’s about to give me a kiss as he exits the car, he’ll shout “Wait, I just ate a glutenous breakfast sandwich!!” as he turns to kiss me on the cheek instead.
  • They call me up to check on items before using it in dishes if I am heading to their house for a meal.
  • For those who now have a good handle on what naturally has gluten and what doesn’t, their attention has now shifted to ways in which cross-contamination can occur in prep.
  • They tell me about, send me links to, pick me up a sample of any new gluten free products that they see.
  • They forward me gluten-free recipes, or even surprise me with gluten free cookbooks.
  • They have started modifying their naturally containing gluten recipes so that I don’t feel left out!
  • They keep their cupboards stocked with gluten free snacks (in the event that I pop by and I’m hungry).
  • They offer to let me pick a place that they know that I can get good gluten-free options at when we dine out.

The biggest challenge has been for my family back home in my small rural hometown, Twillingate (which had a rough population of just over 2400 people as of 2006). Because it’s a small town, there’s not a lot of options when looking for food alternatives and often food has to be bought at the closest “large centre” (i.e. Gander, with a population of roughly 11,000 in 2011), which is roughly a hour and a half drive away. So, this year when I travelled home for Christmas, I came bearing my own bag of gluten-free goodies: canned soup, wraps, Nourish bread & bagels, toaster-bags, Cashew Lärabars, Kind Fruit & Nut bars, plus additional supplies to make gluten-free cookies during my visit.

The first night that I arrived I asked my mom what was for supper and she was so proud that she had made a separate Mac & Cheese without the Ritz Crackers. When I asked her where she picked up the gluten-free pasta she looked at me with the most mortified look and said “But, you can eat macaroni ….. !? ….. I’ve heard you say a dozen times that you’ve had pasta for supper” and I smiled as I looked to her and said “I can eat gluten-free macaroni”. Poor Mom was devastated that she had been so careful to make my meal safe for me to eat, only to discover that it was completely made of gluten. She said that she figured that it would probably take her all of Christmas to get over the fact that she didn’t have a safe meal for me when I got home that night. I told her that I had brought some gluten free groceries with me and that I could very quickly open and warm a can of soup. After supper she scored brownie-points when she broke out some Chocolate Mice (cookies) that she had made for me (not sure what they are? Check out this recipe on Rock Recipes). She had picked up some Gluten Free Rice Krispies, had checked the chocolate chips and other ingredients for sources of gluten, and even had went so far to buy a brand new jar of peanut butter so that she didn’t have to worry about glutenous crumb-contamination in the jar!) They were delicious and I probably ate 7 (no joke!) that first night!! Mom also had my Aunt G pick up a package of President’s Choice Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies when she was in Gander so I also gorged myself on those as well over the holiday when everyone else was eating homemade cookies.  The next day my mom made a delicious pot of homemade soup which fed me for several meals while I was home – Mom’s homemade soup is one of my favourites! I thought that I had left a pack of Glutino table crackers to go with the soup but I must have finished them off the last time I was out or brought them back to the city with me. I will have to remember for the next time I pack my GF grocery bag! 🙂

When I stopped by my mom-in-law’s the next day I discovered, that she had discovered, that one of the local grocery stories starting stocking Udi’s gluten-free products in its freezer section. She had picked up Udi’s GF white sandwich bread (which I actually hadn’t tried up until this point because we never really did buy much bread before I went gluten-free), Udi’s GF Cinnamon Rolls (which I also hadn’t tried up until this point), and also had picked up a pack of gluten-free flour when she was in Gander earlier that month.

One night my Aunt G had invited us up for supper. She made ham, baked and scalloped potatoes, as well as marinated carrots. My aunt remembered that the tomato soup in her recipe for marinated carrots contained gluten so she made me a version that she substituted with ketchup, brown sugar and vinegar. She also remembered to take out some scalloped potatoes before she added the cream of mushroom soup which contains gluten (she had no idea that you can get gluten-free cream of mushroom soup in St. John’s, so for the next time that I’m out and she makes it, I’ll be sending her out some GF Cream of Mushroom Soup so that she can make one casserole dish of gluten-free scalloped potatoes instead of fooling around to make different versions). And to top it all off, Aunt G had also picked up President’s Choice Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies for me as well!

I was so excited to see my family finding ways to accommodate my intolerance. Both my mom, aunt, and mom-in-law pride themselves on making our favourite meals when we come home and they finally felt like they could cook for me again 🙂

My mom-in-law (or “Mama Sheila” as I like to refer to her) used the gluten free flour to make Homemade Stew with “Baked Pudding”. For those of you who aren’t sure what I’m referring to when I say Baked Pudding, I stumbled upon this recipe (we call it baked pudding but she calls it a biscuit/pastry).

Mama Sheila didn’t use these exact recipes but I assume that they were very similar. I’m pretty sure that she substituted the gluten-free flour for the regular wheat flour in the baked pudding. Normally when you make something with gluten-free flour you add a binding agent (such as guar gum, among others), but the like-for-like substitution seemed to work out just as good. Generally we lay the baked pudding on a plate, and then pour the stew over the baked pudding and let the gravy soak into the pudding. Veggies, gravy, baked pudding …. what more could a girl ask for?

One of our Christmas traditions that we’ve established over the past 5+ years is that we (my Guy and I) will open Christmas presents at my house first thing on Christmas morning and then we drive on over (to the opposite side of the harbour) to open presents with his parents. A few years back (several before I went gluten free), Mama Sheila made a “Breakfast Strata” for the first time and it was absolutely delicious!! The Breakfast Strata has since become a part of our Christmas morning tradition, and so she was able to use the Udi’s GF bread and the GF Rice Krispies to make me my very one Gluten Free version. Basically it’s bread, eggs, ham, peppers, cheese, a few seasonings and topped with Rice Krispies. We’ve agreed to only have it on Christmas day so that it remains extra special!

Breakfast Strata

Can you say Om Nom Nom!?

Unfortunately Mama Doreen (i.e. my mom) had to work most of the time that I was home for the holiday. So, where I could, I stayed at her place to maximize my time with her before she headed to, or after she got home from, work. On the mornings that she had to get up early and head to work, I ended up having breakfast (or in some cases, brunch) at Mama Sheila’s. One morning my dad-in-law, or Papa Garry as I like to refer to him as, made me Gluten Free French Toast using the Udi’s bread. One morning I had a simple breakfast of fresh fruit, greek yogurt and Udi’s toast. The final brunch was a huge family effort. If there’s one thing that the Guy family are good at – it’s brunch! Gluten-Free pancakes, turkey bacon, hash brown patties, and Mama Sheila even discovered some gluten free maple sausages that were delicious!! 🙂

Xmas Breakfast

Christmas was a gluten free success but our trip was short. My Guy had to head back to work on the 27th so we were on the road again on Boxing Day to head back into town. I had a few days to get ready for the arrival of my BFF, Jenny, from Toronto who came baring gluten-free chocolates … which included two boxes of Coco Mira Crunch in Mocha Latte and Dark Chocolate flavours … That girl knows that way to my heart!!

My guy’s Aunt Marguerite has been making lovely gift baskets ever year and we she always gives us an awesome one every year for Christmas. Throughout the year she’ll collect things that are of interest to us (some examples: BBQing or meal prep gear for Rob, cake decorating or gluten-free items for me) and in the Fall she’ll arrange them all to make a fantastic basket! This year she had a box of President’s Choice Gluten-Free The Smart Cookie, a box of Chocolate Chip Quinoa cookies and Cinnamon Quinoa Crunchies from GoGo Quinoa. Other goodies included chocolate, homemade pickles, homemade jams, as well as some non-GF items for my guy and a pack of dog treats for our Lakeland Terrier, Jax.

Christmas Basket

Aunt Marguerite also invited us over for a meal during Christmas while her daughter Corinne and family were still visiting from Calgary. Not long after I went gluten free back in 2011, I found out that Aunt Marguerite’s other daughter, Renee had also went gluten-free. As a result, Aunt Marguerite has become very knowledgable in preparing gluten-free meals. When we went for supper I discovered that she had made a roast with gravy made from cornstarch in lieu of regular flour; had made baby carrots and peas which were naturally gluten-free; a creamy mashed potato dish in which she checked all the ingredients to ensure that they were gluten-free; a broccoli casserole in which she grated up Udi’s Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns to use as a crust; and to top it all off she made me a big batch of gluten-free chocolate cookies (which I am still enjoying as of today)! It was a fabulous meal 🙂

Dinner at Aunt Marguerites

Rob won a turkey at his curling club and decided to give it to our good friends Darren and Tracey to smoke on their Big Green Egg. Sadly, like many of the other meals that we had over the holidays, I forgot to get a photo of the smoked bird before Darren carved it. Rob made a gluten free dressing using Udi’s white bread and I had made asparagus and “turnip fries” to bring out as well. When we arrived to Darren & Tracey’s we found that Mitch and Felicia were also there and Felicia was busy peeling carrots and potatoes which we quickly boiled as Tracey made gravy using corn starch (as I had forgotten to bring out some gluten free flour with me). The meal turned out lovely and Darren & Tracey were awesome enough to smoke the turkey and have us out for supper, despite the fact that they were recovering from colds. Such troopers!! 🙂

New Years Dinner

This was only my second Gluten-Free Christmas, and I have to say that it was incredibly delicious and absolutely perfect thanks to my super-awesome family & friends! xoxo

Care to share any ways that your friends and family have successfully adapted to your gluten-free or food allergy-free lifestyle?

FAE’s First Year (2012): An Annual Report Provided by Wordpress!

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 2,400 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 4 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

Allergen Alert: Egg!

So you’ve discovered that you have a egg allergy. No big deal, right? You just won’t have eggs with breakfast anymore …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Egg pops up in a lot more dishes, than you originally thought. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain eggs

    • Baked goods (including some type of breads) and baking mixes
    • Battered and fried foods
    • Cream-filled desserts, for example, custards, meringues, puddings and ice creams
    • Egg and fat substitutes
    • Fat replacers, for example, Simplesse™
    • Lecithin
    • Mayonnaise
    • Meat products with fillers, for example, meatballs and meatloaf
    • Nougats, marzipan candy
    • Pasta (fresh pasta, some types of dry pasta for example, egg noodles)
    • Quiche, soufflé
    • Salad dressings, creamy dressings
    • Sauces, for example, Béarnaise, hollandaise, Newburg, tartar

Other possible sources of eggs

    • Alcoholic cocktails and drinks, for example, eggnog and whiskey sours
    • Fish mixtures, for example, surimi (used in imitation crab and lobster meat)
    • Foam and milk toppings on coffee
    • Homemade root beer mixes and malt-drink mixes
    • Icing, glazes
    • Meat products with fillers, for example, preprepared hamburger patties, hotdogs and cold cuts
    • Soups, broths and bouillons

Non-food sources of egg

    • Anesthetic, for example, Diprivan (propofol)
    • Craft materials
    • Hair-care products
    • Medications
    • Some vaccines, for example, MMR (measles, mumps and rubella)

Note: These lists are not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Egg – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_egg-oeuf/index-eng.php.

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, egg allergy FAQs, sources of egg, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) also has a good reference page on Food Allergies and Allergen Labelling Information for Consumers.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the CFIA. When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 1
Reason for Recall: Allergen – egg
Product(s): Kinnikinnick Foods Pie Crusts
Recalling Firm: Kinnikinnick Foods Inc.
Distribution: British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario, but may have been distributed nationally.

Product details are available at:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2012/20121229e.shtml

Common food allergens – http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food_allergies

What’s a Class 1 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a high risk case (There is a high risk that eating or drinking that product will lead to serious health problems or death).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you’ll also find these alerts on the FAE Facebook Page if you are a big Facebooker and have Liked the Page. You can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! :)

 

Allergen Alert: Soy!

So you’ve discovered that you have a soy allergy. No big deal, right? You just stick with plain white rice vs. the traditional fried rices that contain soya sauce …

I’m afraid to break it to you, my friend. Soy is found in a lot more than just your favourite Asian take-out dish. Here’s a list of ingredients or potential ingredients in which your new found nemesis might sneak up on you.

Food and products that contain or often contain mustards:

  • Bean sprouts
  • Bread crumbs, cereals and crackers
  • Breaded foods
  • Hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP), hydrolyzed soy protein (HSP) and hydrolyzed vegetable
  • protein (HVP)
  • Imitation dairy food
  • Infant formula, follow-up formula, nutrition supplements for toddlers and children
  • Meal replacements
  • Meat products with fillers, for example, burgers and prepared ground meat products
  • Mexican foods, for example, chili, taco fillings and tamales
  • Miso
  • Nutrition supplements
  • Sauces, for example, soy, shoyu, tamari,teriyaki, Worcestershire
  • Simulated fish and meat products, for example, surimi, imitation bacon bits,vegetarian burgers
  • Stews, for example, in gravies
  • Tempeh
  • Vegetarian dishes

Other possible sources of soy:

  • Baked goods and baking mixes
  • Beverage mixes, for example, hot chocolate and lemonade
  • Canned tuna and minced hams, for example, seasoned or mixed with other ingredients for flavour
  • Chewing gum
  • Cooking spray, margarine, vegetable shortening and vegetable oil
  • Dressings, gravies and marinades
  • Frozen desserts
  • Lecithin
  • Milled corn
  • Meat products with fillers, for example, preprepared hamburger patties, hotdogs and cold cuts
  • Seafood -based products and fish
  • Seasoning and spices
  • Snack foods, for example, soy nuts
  • Soups, broths, soup mixes and stocks
  • Soy pasta
  • Spreads, dips, mayonnaise and peanut butter
  • Thickening agents
  • Mono-diglyceride
  • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (may contain hydrolyzed protein)

Non-food sources of soy:

  • Cosmetics and soaps
  • Craft materials
  • Glycerine
  • Milk substitutes for young animals
  • Pet food
  • Vitamins

Note: This list is not complete and may change. Food and food products purchased from other countries, through mail-order or the Internet, are not always produced using the same manufacturing and labelling standards as in Canada.

Source: Health Canada: Soy – One of the ten priority food allergenshttp://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2012-allergen_soy-soja/index-eng.php

The Health Canada link is great and gives a general overview of allergic reactions, soy allergy FAQs, sources of mustard, cross-contamination, steps that the Canadian Government have taken to deal with food allergies, as well as links for more information.

You can be further prepared by keeping an eye out for food recalls and allergy alerts that are put out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). When you subscribe to the email notifications, you can select the specific allergens that you are interested in receiving alerts on. When you receive the alert, it will look something like this:

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class 3
Reason for Recall: Allergen – mustard
Product(s): certain Savoury Express and Sub Delicious brand products
Recalling Firm: King’s Processing Ltd.
Distribution: New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island

Product details are available at http://active.inspection.gc.ca/scripts/database/recarapp_refsubmit.asp?lang=e&ref=7689

What’s a Class 3 Recall, you ask? It’s how the CFIA categorizes the recall. In this case, it’s a low or no risk case (Eating or drinking that product will not likely result in any undesirable health effects. Class III recalls can include food products that pose no health and safety risk, but do not follow federal food regulations).  Recall Class definitions are described in detail on the CFIA website: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-safety-system/food-recalls/eng/1332206599275/1332207914673

If you are afraid that these notifications might get buried in the long list of daily emails in your inbox, you can also get alerts via Twitter by Following @CFIA_Food

Safe & Happy Eating! :)